Transcendental Meditation

  • I do TM, though I know others who do mindfulness meditation  or use meditation apps.
  • My friend Paul summed it up well: when he got into TM he soon got better at maintaining the other aspects of his health regimen.
  • I have been interested in meditation since I was an early teenager, when I came across a book named Concentration by Mouni Sadhu.
  • Since then I have explored, off and on, different types of meditation and might even say most of the major kinds we come across in the west.
  • I have studied Zen Buddhism, including a retreat in Dallas, a visit to a monastery or two, and of course our own midtown Zen Buddhist Temple on 63rd St.
  • I’ve come across, like many other people, the mindfulness meditation that most people attribute to the work of Jon Kabat Zinn (this seems to have worked its way into many yoga studios).
  • Pranayama I experienced when I attended for some years classes at the Iyengar Yoga Institute on 22nd St. I saw its power and still practice it some, but I can’t stay interested for more than about 4 or 5 minutes. My mind wanders and of course the goal is to bring the mind back to the breath but somehow I don’t find that working for me.
  • And then finally I discovered TM!
  • It’s the best fit for me – the one method I can do consistently – and I guess the reasons are: it’s easy, it feels good, and I see results “in action” (i.e. after the session) just about every time I do it.
  • The only bad thing about TM is that it is not inexpensive to learn. It is worth it, sure, many times over, but at the same time, $1000 is a lot for some people. That’s a major difference between TM and mindfulness meditation, which is …free. (Instruction is available on Youtube, etc.)
  • Then again, in the larger context, the organization offers scholarships, etc.